Lemon Rosemary Shortbread

Eight years ago this fall, my sister, Chelsea, was living in San Francisco doing an externship through her architecture program. Chelsea thoughtfully sent me a package of local treasures including a few lemons and fresh rosemary. Apparently both were growing abundantly in the neighborhood where she lived, and as a passionate foodie, she figured I would appreciate the gifts, which of course I did. While searching for a use for them, I stumbled upon a recipe for lemon rosemary shortbread. I was intrigued by the idea of using a savory herb like rosemary in a dessert. I have to say that the combination of buttery cookie with the floral flavors of lemon and rosemary go together perfectly. The cookies were delicious!

Eight years later (last month) I found myself with a surplus of fresh rosemary – literally. I received some rosemary in my Imperfect Produce box, (they’re an awesome company that takes produce that is scarred, misshapen, or in excess – and which retailers won’t sell – and sends it to consumers in a weekly customized box.) I love fresh rosemary and so when I saw there was a surplus (and from California!) I happily added it to my order, without really knowing how I’d use it. So with an itch to bake, I decided to make those lemon rosemary shortbread cookies once again, if my almost 7 month old baby would let me of course.

Slight tangent here, but it’s funny how delusional about my life as a stay-at-home mom I can be. Sometimes I find myself waking up thinking about what I want to do that day and dreaming up all these recipes I want to make. Somehow I’m reminded that I am a mother and my young, not-yet-crawling baby is likely going to occupy most of my day. Today, however, she took a longer than usual nap so I threw together a batch of these cookies.

Unfortunately I never took a picture of the finished product but hopefully you get the idea. Picture perfectly buttery, golden cookies that go perfectly with a cup of tea on a rainy day (hello Seattle winter!) and you probably have the right image in your mind. And if you’re doubtful of the rosemary and cookies combination, let me tell you that my neighbor, who is not generally a fan of rosemary, loved them and said the flavor was not too strong.

Lemon Rosemary Shortbread Cookies

2 sticks (1/2 cup) unsalted butter, at room temperature

3/4 cup granulated sugar

1 egg yolk

1 lemon, zested

2 1/4 cups all-purpose flour

1/2 tsp. salt

1 T. chopped, fresh rosemary

1/2 tsp. vanilla extract (optional)

Cream together butter and sugar for a few minutes until light and fluffy. Add egg yolk and beat until incorporated. Add vanilla now if using. Combine the flour, salt, and lemon zest, rubbing it into the flour to break up the pieces. Add to the butter, beating on low to incorporate or fold in with a spatula. Fold in fresh rosemary. Wrap dough in plastic and put in the fridge to firm up for at least 30 minutes.

When dough is ready, preheat your oven to 375 F. Roll out your dough on a floured surface to about 1/4 inch thick and cut into squares or use your favorite cookie cutter. Space cookies about 2 inches apart and bake until golden brown – 10-12 minutes. I even almost burned a batch of mine (due to taking care of the baby) and they still tasted good!

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Halloween Cookies & Parenthood

Before my daughter was born, a part of me thought I would have more time to do things like write a blog post. I mean babies sleep a lot, right? So couldn’t I just whip up a blog post during one of her frequent naps? Well, sometimes babies fall asleep on you or sometimes you need to eat while she sleeps. Sometimes I have had time to write, but I was too tired to write anything. Or sometimes I haven’t had the time because my child takes mostly half hour naps, and by the time I put her down and go to the bathroom and brush my teeth and get dressed and whatever basic things I need to accomplish, five minutes are left. Continue reading

Homemade Filo for Baklava and Apple Tart

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I became a mother almost two months ago and sometimes it still doesn’t feel like it’s real. It’s like how did I suddenly (though it wasn’t really) become a mother? Somehow, it feels like motherhood is something that has to be earned over a longer period of time, not something you can become in just one day when a baby is born. I’m not trying to discredit other mothers, by any means. We have certainly earned the title after carrying our babies in our bodies for 9+ months and going through childbirth, but somehow the title still feels strange. I’m sure it’s just like being married or changing your name in that it’s something that I will get used to over time.

I thought motherhood would make me a different person, but mostly I still feel the same except with a baby. Feeling the same is good of course, as I didn’t want to lose who I was, but I somehow expected this overwhelming feeling of a change in identity. Maybe that also develops over time as I will interact with the world and my baby as a mother.

Of course one of the things that makes me me is my love of food and cooking. In the first few weeks of motherhood I definitely did not have the time or energy to cook and I was grateful to the friends who brought us food and the meals I’d prepared ahead of time to stock our freezer. It was hard enough to remember to eat or find time to eat when my focus was on feeding my baby and getting enough sleep. In recent weeks I’ve felt myself getting back to normal with my desire to get my hands dirty in the kitchen coming on strong. For some reason this week that desire manifested itself in homemade filo/phyllo dough, which I used to make baklava and an apple tart. I enjoyed the process of making the filo dough, though it didn’t turn out as thin as I would have liked, and I was able to use some nuts that were past their “best by” date (they’re still good!)

The baklava I made was based on this recipe here and the apple tart one I made up with a sheet of leftover dough I had. It felt good to get in the kitchen again and create something with my hands, though it certainly wasn’t the same as it used to be. I made the recipe in steps over an afternoon, evening, and morning, with interruptions determined by a certain hungry baby. In the future, hopefully she’ll be helping me to cook.

Apple Filo Tart

4-6 sheets of filo dough, thawed if frozen*

1 large apple of your choice, peeled and diced

2 T. brown sugar

1 T. flour

1/2 tsp. ground cinnamon

3-4 T. unsalted butter, melted

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F and line a cookie sheet with parchment paper. Lay your sheets of filo dough on the parchment, brushing with butter every two layers or just on top if using homemade. In a medium bowl mix diced apple, sugar, flour, and cinnamon. Spread the apple mixture in a circle in the middle of your filo dough making sure that the apples are not piled on each other, though don’t be too picky about it. Gently fold the extra filo over the apple mixture and brush the top with butter. You may not use all of the butter.

Bake in the preheated oven for 20-30 minutes until lightly browned and crispy. Let cool and cut into slices.

*I used only one sheet of my homemade dough, though it was thicker than the store-bought kind.

Saveur’s Chocolate Chip Cookies

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Most people won’t say no to chocolate chip cookies, whether overcooked or store-bought. Chocolate chip cookies are an American classic and definitely a recipe I have made and eaten thousands of times. Maybe the internet is to blame or maybe it’s just my curiosity for baking, but despite the number of times I’ve made the chewy, gooey hand-held dessert, I still sometimes feel the need to try a new recipe. Social media tends to make us feel pressured to constantly achieve bigger (or smaller) and better whether through our perfectly toned and tanned bodies, our flawlessly frosted cakes, or our carefully crafted home decor. Yes, your chocolate chip cookie recipe may already be amazing, but the lure of the internet will lead you to believe that this one is the best. Continue reading

Crispy Waffles

The reason I try recipes over and over: perfection, or something close to it. In my mind, most foods can always be improved upon and so I try different versions and recipes until it’s exactly what I’m looking for (or good enough for the moment anyway). Growing up we often had waffles on Saturday mornings. Crispy, slightly eggy, soaked in syrup waffles – at least that’s how I remember them. My dad was the waffle master, separating the egg yolks from the whites and beating them until they were fluffy and peaked. The beaten egg whites were supposed to make the waffles fluffy and so we continued to make our waffles that way even when it felt like more work than measuring out a few cups of waffle mix and adding water. I remember the waffles were crispy and that you knew that by the sound they made when you dug the side of the fork tines into the waffle for that first bite.

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Continue reading

Breakfast Berry Pie (gluten free!)

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For some reason last week I ended up eating a lot of pie. Monday I went to a movie with a friend and we followed it up with a delicious slice of pie at Pie Bar (the Ballard Bumble Berry Crumble is amazing!). Wednesday evening Sam and I took a mini vacation to Whidbey Island and ended our evening with a shared (and equally scrumptious) berry tart (basically an individual pie) at Christopher’s. Then the next day we stopped at Whidbey Pies for lunch and though we started with a savory pie for lunch, we also ended it, of course, with a slice of dessert pie. Continue reading

Homemade Pop-Tarts

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It’s probably a good thing that some of the kids in my fourth grade class have never eaten a Pop-Tart. I mean they aren’t exactly healthy and more importantly they are actually kinda dry and bland. You can totally make them way better yourself.

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Sure there’s a certain nostalgia to buying that familiar box of shiny, foil-wrapped “tarts” that keep forever. We ate them every now and then growing up, though of course Mom often bought the low-fat unfrosted kind, in which case… what’s the point? That crispy, crunch of dried frosting is part of what makes the Pop-Tart so delicious, and when you’re talking about a pastry, (whether processed or homemade) reducing the fat is the last thing that you need. In pastries, butter equates to flakey, melt-in-your-mouth texture so you don’t want to skimp on that. But of course there was that period of time when everything was offered in a low-fat version because that’s what was supposedly better for us. Anyway, I’m not a dietician.

I remember also eating Pop-Tarts sometimes in college. There was an on campus convenience store called “Mom’s” that sold them in two-packs. Being a newly independent adult who was busy with homework and probably eating mostly unhealthy foods, (especially those that might have been restricted as a child) I probably bought a few too many Pop-Tarts from Mom’s. That and pints of Ben & Jerry’s ice cream…

I made Pop-Tarts with my fourth graders yesterday as part of a thing we do called, “Each One Teach One.” It’s basically an opportunity for kids to practice their presentation skills and teach the class about something that they love. As one of their teachers, I demonstrated mine yesterday by making Pop-Tarts. To save time we used store-bought pie dough. Then I did a demo of how to make homemade dough if you wanted to start from scratch.

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The purchased pie dough tarts were a grand success and I enjoyed the chance to share something I loved with the kids. Of course I ended up with the leftover dough I had showed them how to make so I decided to make it for myself at home… I didn’t get a picture of the ones made with the pie crust, but I can promise you they were not nearly as flakey as these guys. I mean check out those layers!

If you want to make it yourself, follow this recipe for homemade dough or this one for making it the easier (yet less tasty!) way. The first recipe uses a brown sugar cinnamon filling and the second uses a jam filling. I made both.

I had some extra dough leftover so I ended up making some C’s and S’s for fun. At first Sam thought the S was for him and asked, “Who’s the C for?” Ha!

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Warning! These are super rich and buttery and flakey! I made mine a little large and a sliver of one was plenty for me. These might make a super scrumptious dessert if left unfrosted (gasp!) and topped with ice cream.

Hope you go make some!