Post 102 – Sushi making

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With all the snow falling this time of year (in Boston especially), I find myself leaning toward the heavy, filling foods: meaty, hearty, stick-to-your-ribs kind of food. Winter time means you load up on the food that keeps you warm and satisfied. You bust out the crock pot and get your oven cranking so that you can make all of the thick stews and freshly baked breads needed to fill you up. I love a big pot of Cincinnati Chili or Beef Stew, but after a few days, I find myself wanting to balance out my heavy meat consumption with something a little lighter, but this time of year most veggies seem scarce and a summer salad hardly seems appealing. So how do I lighten things up?

In general I try to eat a balanced diet and as wide a variety of all food groups as possible. Nonetheless I still struggle on a daily basis with what I should be eating for my diet in general. More protein? More veggies? Less fat? More fat? The answer I give myself is constantly changing. After reading this National Geographic article on the evolution of diet, though no more enlightened on the issue of what to eat, I realized the wide diversity of diets that are sustaining people across this planet. I began to think about how grateful I am not to have to hunt for or gather my food. I do have to lug my groceries back from the store, (less than a mile away, though in this snow it’s more of a chore) but I’m not afraid of not having enough to eat because I have to catch dinner. In this country we are privileged to have so many choices of what to eat. Without this choice I would never be asking myself what should I eat. Perhaps the ability to choose itself is something to appreciate.

IMG_1204So I’m getting my veggies in today via sushi. Admittedly most of the veggies are eaten outside of the sushi, but hey I ate them so that counts for something. If you make your own sushi, you’ll realize how few veggies really fit inside.

IMG_1206After college when I lived in Ohio for a short time before moving to Boston, I enjoyed volunteering at a small cooking school associated with an upscale grocery store. In exchange for helping to set up and clean up I got to watch each chef in action and keep the recipes from the class. It was a great gig and though it could be exhausting, it gave me a good introduction into the professional culinary world. I loved the nights I volunteered at a cooking class. In one of the many classes that I went to we learned to make sushi.

IMG_1207Of course after going to the class and seeing how relatively do-able it is to make your own sushi, I got suckered in to buying the sushi rolling bamboo mats, which I use every now and then (including for this week’s school cooking club!). I learned that just learning how to cook the rice correctly takes years of training in Japan! Sushi making is definitely a skill.

IMG_1208I filled mine today with carrots, cucumber, avocado, and shrimp. I used brown rice because that’s what I had on hand, but there is a special type of sushi rice available that has the right stickiness for sushi.

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IMG_1210Served with thin slivers of pickled ginger, soy sauce, and the extra fillings on this side, this made for a tasty way to eat my veggies! It makes for a nice break from the usual heavy winter fare.

IMG_1212Sushi Rice

It’s hard to write a real recipe for sushi as technique is easiest demonstrated rather than described and fillings can be whatever you want. One way to make your sushi extra… er sushi-flavored (?) is to make sushi rice. After you cook your rice, whether it is actual sushi rice or just short grain brown rice, mix in a mixture of rice wine vinegar, sugar and salt. You’ll want about 1 teaspoon of rice vinegar, 1/2 teaspoon of sugar, and an 1/8 teaspoon of salt per half cup of uncooked rice (though you’ll add this mixture after cooking).

Stir the vinegar, sugar, and salt together to dissolve the mixture. When the rice is done, spread it out on a plate or a sheet pan to help it cool and let out some of the moisture. Drizzle in some of your vinegar mixture, carefully folding it into the rice. Taste and add more as desired for flavor. Be careful not to add too much as you want your rice to be somewhat sticky, not wet. Use your sushi rice to spread on Nori (seaweed) and top with fillings as suggested below for your sushi. Enjoy!

Possible fillings

cucumber, carrots, avocado, red pepper, scallion – cut in long thin strips

cooked shrimp, smoked salmon, tofu, cooked chicken

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