Stove Top Personal Pizza

Surprisingly I didn’t miss the snow this winter. Maybe a little bit, a tiny little itty bit, but mostly not. Winter in Seattle is mild, dark, cold, and rainy for sure, but no half melted slush, cold feet traipsing through half-shoveled sidewalks, sleeting ice in your face, and below freezing temperatures that require wearing leggings under your jeans and trying to decide if you should change out of them when you get too hot at work. Thank you, Seattle. Thank you for your mild winter that is slowly morphing into a beautiful spring!

Spring is gorgeous out in the Pacific Northwest! There are colorful flowers of every kind everywhere and though there aren’t many plants and parks in the city, there are plenty of places within reach to see nature’s beauty at it’s best: Golden Gardens, Magnuson Park, and Discovery Park to name a few. Even just running around Green Lake in my own backyard is a beautiful sight that I am grateful for every day. (It’s usually not that blue, but I’ll take it!)

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It still isn’t hot here yet, which I’m happy about, but the hot weather will be here before we know it, and with that the need to find meals that don’t require the oven (or at least not for very long). Last weekend, after returning from a run and feeling rather warm, I wanted to make a pizza without heating up the apartment. I had pizza dough and toppings ready to go and wanted to make something quick. Enter stove-top personal pizza! It goes in the broiler just a few short minutes at the end to brown the cheese (which I suppose you could totally skip) and then you quickly turn off the oven before the heat takes over. Perfect for a quick weeknight meal or a quick weekend lunch!

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Bon appetit!

Stove Top Personal Pizza

tennis ball size blob of easy homemade pizza dough* (see recipe below)

pizza sauce

cheese

toppings of your choice

Heat a large cast iron skillet or broiler proof pan over medium heat. Swirl a glug of olive oil in and let your pan heat up. Meanwhile roll out your dough on a floured surface until it is about a 1/4 inch thick. Make sure it is not too big for your pan! When the pan is hot, make sure the oil has coated the pan and carefully lay your rolled out dough circle in.

Now is the time to turn your preheat broiler to high. Allow your dough to cook in the pan for a minute or so, watching for bubbles to start forming on the surface. Using a wide spatula or tongs carefully flip your pizza and gently press down to brown the other side. You can also lift it up to check for doneness before flipping and give it a little longer if needed.

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Check out those bubbles!

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Top with sauce, cheese and other toppings and allow to cook on the heat another minute. Turn off your burner and carefully transfer the topped pizza to the oven to broil, keeping an eye out so the cheese doesn’t burn. Broil for 5-8 minutes, depending on your broiler and how well done you want your pizza. Remove, let cool, and serve it up! Be careful as it will be hot and fresh from the oven!

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If you totally want to skip the broiler you probably could, but don’t expect browning. You would want to just leave it on the heat long enough to melt the cheese and heat your toppings. You could also cover it with a lid to encourage melting, but you might end up with a steamed, soggy crust. Broiler is best and when I did it, it had hardly heated up so it didn’t make the apartment hot.

Happy spring! Happy eating 🙂

And if you want to make your own dough, here’s a recipe. Make ahead of time and store in the fridge for when you’re ready!

 

* Easy Homemade Pizza Dough – no kneading!

(makes enough for probably 6 personal pizzas) from Artisan Breads in Five Minutes a Day

1.5 cups lukewarm water

2 1/4 tsp active dry yeast (1 packet)

2 1/4 tsp Kosher salt

1/2 cup whole wheat flour

2 3/4 cup unbleached all-purpose flour

Mix the yeast and salt with water in a large bowl that has a lid. Add whole wheat flour and all-purpose and mix with a wooden spoon, using your hands to incorporate the last bit of flour if necessary (alternatively you can do the whole thing with a food processor or stand mixer). Cover the bowl with the lid, leaving it not completely sealed and let rise at room temperature for 2 hours or until doubled in size. Refrigerate until ready to use (dough is easiest to use when cold). Dough can be used for up to a week after making it if kept refrigerated.

 

 

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Cooking for the Week Ahead

It has been too long. I am still here. I am still eating. I am still cooking. I am still writing.

Life has been busy and different. I no longer come home in the afternoons after work to shop and cook dinner. (In fact I now work almost 8 hours more per week than I used to!) Instead I try and spend Sunday evenings stocking up on foods to pack for lunch and dinner for the week ahead. With my new schedule I get home from work just in time to kiss my wonderful husband, heat up some leftovers, and thank my past self for making them. During the work day, instead of staying on my toes pulling pans in and out of the oven and serving hungry children, I’m on my (mental) toes keeping parents happy, making sure their kids get the care they need. It’s a different life. When I can I go for runs around this beautiful lake.

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So how I do plan around my new and busier schedule? I try to make foods that will travel and keep well and feed me with comfort and keep me full until the next snack. These blueberry walnut muffins were made as a challenge to myself while one of my friends was avoiding processed sugar. They contain a little bit of honey, plus whole wheat flour, oats, walnuts, and of course blueberries! The oats and nuts make them more filling, add great contrasting textures, and are also quite tasty!

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I know some of your are scoffing the the mention of whole wheat flour in a muffin, but trust me – these were well-received after our long and muddy hike!

IMG_2584This quinoa and chickpea salad is my new favorite go-to lunch salad. I adapted mine from this one on the New York Times Cooking site and I especially enjoy it with roasted carrots. Made with canned chickpeas and a few chopped veggies, it’s fairly quick to make (especially if you use couscous). If you make a big batch at the beginning of the week, you will be set for lunches for the week!

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Another quick and healthy lunch is a big salad. Boxed mixed greens, chopped deli meat, cheese cubes, nuts (toasted, if you’re fancy) and dried fruit make for a delicious lunch. Bring a bottle of dressing to work or a little container of your own if you can.

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For dinners, soups and stews make for tasty fare and can be especially easy if you throw it all in the crock pot. Above is one of my favorites – Ginger Chicken Meatball Soup – adapted from this lovely recipe. When I plan my meals for the week I try to make at least two recipes, preferably one in the oven or on the stove and the other in the crock pot. Between the two of us packing lunch everyday and eating dinner at home, we need a lot of food!

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On the weekends when you have some time to relax and you’re feeling somewhat ambitious, make yourself some pancakes, fluffy and warm, served hot from the skillet. Top them with bananas, toasted nuts, and real maple syrup. Don’t go out to brunch. Make it at home instead! Then you don’t have to decide between ordering the pancakes and the omelette – you can have both!

Ah yes, but the weekends don’t last long, so you enjoy them while you can. Go out to dinner, whip up a homemade dessert for your loved ones, and then get ready to get ready for the week ahead once again. Even if the week is a rough one, at least you can say you were well-fed!

 

 

Vegetable Galette & Mixed Berry Tart

Here in the Pacific Northwest, people love to hike. With plenty of beautiful hiking trails within a reasonable distance, from the Cascade mountains to the east of Seattle and the Olympics to the west, it is easy to see why. When I was a kid my family used to take a lot of camping vacations. We packed our gingersnaps (for carsickness, Mom told us), our tents, and our sleeping bags, and hit the road to camp, hike, and cook on a propane stove. I have many fond memories from our camping trips, like Dad’s rules of camping and the invention of our fake band, Faulty Gravity, but I also remember the hard parts: washing dishes in a basin in the woods when dish-washing at home was already a chore, walking to the bathroom at night with a flashlight, and sleeping on a slowly-deflating mattress with your two sisters as you slowly sank down to the cold, hard earth.

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We did some hiking while we camped and most likely did lots of complaining along the way, as kids often do. In fact it seemed like a long time before exercise became enjoyable to me. My days in Boston taking buses, walking from the bus, or biking to work taught me to appreciate my legs’ ability to carry me a farther distance than I believed. Now I run when I want to, walk because I enjoy it, and hike knowing I can come home and sleep in my own bed, on a real mattress.

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Me walking across a rickety bridge over a bubbling stream

This weekend my friend, Zack, invited me for a hike out near Skykomish. We wore our warmest, water-wicking clothes (and packed extra just in case) and drove out into the foggy mountains of Washington. The hike was beautiful. I felt nothing but a sense of appreciation for the present. I felt calm. I felt in awe of the beauty of nature surrounding me.

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Look closely at the pattern etched in this piece of bark – apparently it’s made by a certain kind of ants!

Along the trail Zack shared his forest knowledge, pointing out various trees, plants, and blackberry leaves, which he informed me grew like a weed in the forest. We shared a snack on the trail of soft Brie and bread, but on the drive home we found ourselves hungry and talking about all the delicious things we wanted to eat. While most food sounded good during our discussion, I found myself inspired by the emerald-green trees and the blackberry leaves to make a meal worthy of such natural wonder.

With the cold drizzle of a typical Seattle day I wanted something both wintery-warm and light, consisting primarily of plant-foods to reflect the day’s hike. I settled on a vegetable galette, very loosely adapted from this one by Melissa Clark. I made half as much dough for a less heavy meal and added sauteed rainbow chard and mushrooms for more veggies. I roasted sweet potatoes to use instead of the pumpkin, but then ended up leaving them out of the galette to keep as a side dish instead.

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The results were not as beautiful as the hike, but satisfying and delicious all the same. And after reading this great article, In Praise of Ugly Food, I hardly cared that it wasn’t the picture of food porn perfection.

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Of course, the blackberry leaves also had me craving a berry tart to follow my veggie pie. Despite the fact that berries aren’t exactly in season, I decided to make my dreamed-up tart, and why not?  When berries are in season hardly anyone wants to run the oven to bake a pie anyway. Winter was perfect pie-baking time.

So I made myself a triple berry pie with fresh blueberries, blackberries, and raspberries and it was delicious.

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Triple Berry Tart

Crust:

1.25 cups all purpose flour

1/4 tsp. salt

1 T. sugar

1/2 stick of unsalted butter, cold

3 T. shortening, chilled

3-4 T. ice water

Filling

4 cups mixed berries*, rinsed and shaken of access water

1/3 cup all purpose flour

1/3 cup sugar

the zest of one lemon

In a medium bowl measure out the 1.25 cups of flour, salt, and tablespoon of sugar. Stir to mix. Cut your butter into chunks and stir into flour to coat, along with the shortening. Using a pastry cutter or breaking up with your fingers, blend the butter and shortening into the flour until the pieces are pea-sized. Drizzle in water, starting with 2 tablespoons and gently stir to moisten the flour. Add more water until your dough can come together into a ball. Don’t overdo it! Flatten into a disk and wrap in plastic. Refrigerate for an hour.

When your dough is chilled, mix together your berries, flour, sugar and lemon zest. It helps to rub the zest into the flour or sugar so that it doesn’t clump. On a floured surface, gently roll out your dough to an even thickness, about 1/4 inch. Aim for a circle, but as a tart this doesn’t have to be a perfect circle. Carefully transfer to a parchment-lined sheet pan. Top with the berry mixture and fold the excess over the top to help contain the berry juices once it starts cooking.

Bake at 375 F for 45 minutes or until the crust is golden and the fruit is bubbling. For best results, let cool before slicing to allow the filling to gel somewhat.

*I used 6 oz. of blueberries, 6 oz. of blackberries and 9 oz. of raspberries.

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When you take a bite, think of the blackberries that grow wild in the forest, blanketing the ground with their dark, bumpy fruits.

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Pan-fried Coconut Shrimp

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Shrimp is one of those foods I usually have to enjoy on my own. That is to say that Sam won’t touch the stuff, even if it’s breaded and fried. I often buy a bag of raw shrimp to keep on hand in the freezer for lunches or dinners where we’re short on food or he’s out of town.

When we honeymooned in Barbados, I kept seeing coconut shrimp on the menus and figured I should try it while we were there. However, other dishes always tantalized me more and though I kept looking for an excuse to order it, not having someone who’d share it with me made it that much more unlikely. Finally on our last night we went to Champers for our final, elaborate, honeymoon feast. They took us to our table on their open deck, overlooking the beautiful Caribbean waters. Thanks to our wonderful hosts at our hotel, the restaurant had surprised us with “just married” confetti and personalized menus congratulating us on our recent wedding.

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Seeing as it was our last night in paradise, we opted for a three-course meal. We each chose our own appetizers, Sam’s a beautiful baked brie with apples and mine the long lusted-after coconut shrimp! They were perfect – crispy and sweet, with sprigs of lettuce for color and crunch and a sweet chili sauce to dip. We followed our appetizers with equally amazing entrees and desserts – three in fact! We ordered two (being the gluttons that we are) and they brought us a surprise extra – a scoop of ice cream with a candle and “congrats” written in chocolate across the plate.

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The famous coconut shrimp at Champers!

We left the restaurant five pounds heavier and happier, me glad to have finally enjoyed my coconut shrimp.

So yesterday, with Thanksgiving leftovers dwindling and a trip to the grocery store in the somewhat distant future, I decided to make myself coconut shrimp for lunch. Other than deep-frying, how hard could it be? The answer: not that bad at all. You dredge your shrimp, throw them in the pan (more like place them carefully and stand back!) and within a few minutes you have tasty, crispy, coconut shrimp.

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Then, since this was a totally impromptu lunch, I whipped up a simple mixture of ketchup and red curry paste to dip them in. Despite the splattering dangers and the mess on the stove afterward, they were worth every bite!

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Pan-fried Coconut Shrimp

serves 1 for a meal or 2 for an appetizer

1/4 lb. raw shrimp (thawed if frozen), peeled and deveined

1/3 cup panko breadcrumbs

1/3 cup unsweetened, shredded coconut

1/4 cup milk

1/4 cup flour

salt and pepper

canola oil for frying

ketchup & red curry paste

Set up your breading station as follows: flour in the first bowl – add a good sprinkle of salt and pepper, milk in the second bowl, and panko and coconut mixed in the third.

Heat a large skillet or deep saucepan (saucepan is probably safer) with oil over medium heat. Add enough oil to form a thin layer on the bottom about 1/4 inch. If you wish to deep-fry you can add several cups of oil, but it will take longer to heat up and can be more dangerous. I did mine in a skillet and though there was some splattering, they were easier to flip.

While the oil heats, bread your shrimp, keeping one hand for dry and one for wet (to avoid breading your hands). Dip in the flour first, milk next, and coconut crumbs last. Put breaded shrimp on a plate. Discard any remaining breading ingredients.

To test your oil, toss in a few extra breadcrumbs and see if they sizzle. When ready, use tongs to transfer your breaded shrimp to the hot oil, being careful not to overcrowd the pan. After you can see they are beginning to brown on the bottom, flip them. Let them cook about another minute and transfer to a paper towel-lined plate. Let cool.

In a small bowl add however much ketchup you’d like. Mix in red curry paste to taste, starting with a small amount and tasting for spice. Dip your shrimp and enjoy!

 

 

Baked Apples and Thoughts on Food and Cooking

I used to cook everyday for a living. I cooked for hungry school children and teachers. I cooked for a busy, young family, and often I’d come home and cook for Sam and me. I used to think that it would be living my dream – to cook all the time and make people happy with the food that I cooked, but I discovered in the last few years that sometimes dreams change once you begin to live them. And sometimes life just takes you in different directions.

For me, I get satisfaction from turning seemingly basic foods into comforting and delicious meals. I like the feel of breaking cold butter into flour, blending the ingredients just enough so they become semi-homogeneous, and rolling out cold dough to lay gently into a pan as if laying a baby down to sleep. I really do enjoy making a homemade pie crust. I love the sensory parts of cooking – touching cake to feel for that spring of doneness, bending my nose over a pot of simmering soup to smell its seasoning, and listening to the crunch and crack of chopping nuts with a sharp knife.

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I’m not cooking anymore, not for work anyway and here’s why:

  1. Cooking loses its intrigue when it becomes repetitive, mandatory, and no longer creative. Sometimes cooking for a living can do that, especially when you’re cooking to particular customer preference.
  2. Those of you who have been following me for a while know that my body has been telling me it doesn’t like the way I eat anymore and while I’ve been trying to listen to what it wants me to eat, I’m having a hard time understanding. Preparing mouth-watering foods for others that I myself can’t eat (or am afraid to eat for fear of not feeling well) has worn on me and so I’d rather not be around food all day every day.
  3. Working in food sometimes means obsessing about food – thinking about what your next meal will be, what you will cook later, and creative new recipes you want to try. Sometimes my obsession with food drove me crazy and I felt it hard to release myself from thinking about it.

I find now that keeping cooking to a hobby still allows me to enjoy the pleasures of food and pleasing others with the food I cook without driving me and my hungry/angry belly crazy. I’ve learned to eat less of the foods I used to indulge in (and perhaps it’s simply a consequence of getting older) and avoid certain foods (though I test them out again here and there.)

What still makes me happy when it comes to cooking:

  1. Stocking the fridge with delicious foods for the week ahead – snacks, meals, cookies.
  2. Using up ingredients and leftovers just in time to restock and replenish.
  3. Making something out of seemingly nothing.

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I started a new job about a month ago (hence part of the reason I’ve been absent here) and it is so very different from my previous food jobs that it has been a bit of an adjustment. Instead of deciding what to eat from the myriad choices of the school cafeteria, I have to pack my lunch ahead of time and hope I’m still in the mood for that food by lunch time. Bustling around a hot stove and oven have been replaced with staring at two large computer monitors while furiously trying to find the information I need to answer the question at hand. I look forward to fresh air lunch time walks and to the end of the work day. It has been a big change, but I’m hoping it will lead to something greater.

Now for a simple recipe to end this long train of thought: Baked Apples. I invited some friends over for brunch yesterday without really considering what I had in my fridge to feed them. Despite the lack of planning, with a few items picked up from the store and a little creativity we had a delicious brunch. I baked homemade challah bread and stuffed some apples we had in the fridge with a delicious amalgamation from what I had on hand. And the results: divine. Now this is the kind of cooking I can enjoy!

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Baked Stuffed Apples

This recipe can be easily scaled up and toyed around with. The below amounts are approximations of what I used.

2 large apples (I used Jonagold)

1/2 lemon

2 T. brown sugar

1 T. butter, softened or melted

dash of salt

cinnamon to taste

ground ginger to taste

2 T. chopped pecans

1-2 T. dried cranberries

Preheat the oven to 350. Lightly butter an 8×8 square pan or other pan that will fit your amount of apples.

Cut the apples in half. Using a melon baller or small spoon gently remove the seeds and core so you get a shallow canal in the middle of each apple half. Squeeze your lemon half over the apples and lightly rub them to make sure they are well covered. Mix your sugar, butter, salt, cinnamon and ginger in a small bowl. Stir in pecans and cranberries. Taste and adjust as desired. Divide mixture between your four apples halves and place in prepared pan. Cover in foil and baked until your desired tenderness 30-45 minutes. Serve warm with brunch or as a dessert with vanilla ice cream.

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Easy Pumpkin Ice Cream – (no machine required!)

IMG_1794Okay fine. I gave into the pumpkin. I love pumpkin – I really do. I was just getting tired of feeling like it got all the excitement and spotlight in the fall. As soon as the first hint of fall and September hits people go pumpkin crazy. I thought maybe it was good to switch it up. But you know how I love to use up leftovers, and I love to try new recipes. Well I had a cup of pumpkin puree sitting in the fridge begging to be used, and since I’d recently made cookies I figured I should go a different direction. Ice cream!

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I had had this recipe tagged for a few months now probably – the two ingredient ice cream recipe that promised to be awesome and easy for those without an ice cream maker. I simply had to test it out. I love ice cream, but I try to keep it out of the house as it is just too tempting and easy to overeat. I mean, you can eat too many cookies, but the numbers guilt you out of it usually. It’s quantifiable. You know you ate 4 cookies, but with ice cream you can say, I just had a bowlful. (Does anyone actual measure their ice cream to meet the serving size?) And then ate a few spoonfuls while I was serving it. And my bowl was pretty darn big. <guilty smile> If I owned an ice cream maker, it would just be another one-trick kitchen gadget that I would use as an excuse to make homemade ice cream way too often. That just sounds dangerous.

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Well now that I’ve found this recipe, I might have just found a new level of kitchen danger because this recipe is way too easy and adaptable and delicious. And unless you want to drink half a can of sweetened condensed milk (okay, yeah you probably do) it’s hard to make a smaller batch.

The great thing about this recipe – besides no machine needed – is its adaptability. You can put any flavor you want in it. In fact I had full intentions of making multiple flavors of ice cream with this batch and then completely forgot when it came time to mix in the pumpkin. Oops!

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Anyway, enough of my rambling. You want to know how to make it? You whip some cream. You fold it into some sweetened condensed milk and you freeze it. And you wait. Then ta-da – ice cream!

Easy Pumpkin Ice Cream (no machine)

1 14-oz can sweetened condensed milk

1 pint whipping cream (2 cups)

1 cup pure pumpkin

1/4 tsp. allspice*

1/8 tsp. ground nutmeg*

1/8-/14 tsp. ground cinnamon*

1 tsp. maple syrup (optional)

If you have time, chill a large mixing bowl and beaters in the freezer for 10 minutes. This helps the cream to stay cold and whip better (in theory). In another large bowl pour your sweetened condensed milk. Stir in remaining ingredients except the cream. Set aside.

In your chilled bowl with your chilled beaters, whip your cream starting out at a low speed to avoid splatters. Gradually increase the speed as it thickens and beat until soft to medium peaks form. It will take some time, but if you’re using a hands-off mixer such as a Kitchenaid mixer, don’t walk away from it or you will end up with butter. After it seems well-whipped, be sure to scrape the sides and bottom with a rubber spatula to make sure the cream at the bottom has been sufficiently whipped. Beat again if you find some cream that is looser.

Gently fold the cream into the pumpkin and sweetened condensed milk mixture. Start with a quarter of the cream and gently fold it with a sweeping motion from the bottom of the bowl to the top and over. Gradually fold in the rest so that the color is uniform. The reason you fold gently as opposed to beating vigorously is so you don’t lose the air you just whipped into your cream. Put a lid on your bowl and freeze for at least 5 hours. You can stir it after a few hours to evenly chill it, but you don’t have to. I found mine took about 8 hours, but it will depend on the depth of the bowl you freeze it in and your freezer.

Scoop into a bowl (or eat straight from the container!) and enjoy!

*You can substitute pumpkin pie spice for the spices I used. Just experiment with the amount. I would guess no more than one teaspoon.

Note: I find this ice cream is best at its “freshest.” Because it is not churned like ice cream machine types it will get icier (instead of staying creamy) as it sits. If you invite your friends over for an ice cream party you can enjoy it at its prime. I also found it helps to let it sit out at room temperature for 15 minutes before scooping, but that will probably depend on the temperature of your freezer.

Bon appetit!

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Fall Cookies: Soft and Chewy Oatmeal Scotchies

IMG_1710Pumpkin gets a lot of hype this time of year. It’s orange to match the foliage, it’s in season at farmers’ markets and apple orchards, and it’s darn delicious when you whisk in some warm fall spices and sugar to sweeten the deal. This time of year we see recipes for everything pumpkin from pumpkin soup to pumpkin cookies to pumpkin cheesecake. Don’t get me wrong – I love pumpkin, but I wanted to distinguish myself here. I was hoping to stand out from the crowds of pumpkin spice lattes and pumpkin donuts. (I guess I did make this pumpkin creme brulee once.)

Growing up, one of my sister’s favorite cookies was called an oatmeal scotchie. It started with a traditional cookie dough with some rolled oats but then you swirled in some butterscotch chips (scotchies!) baked them until crispy. I liked them well enough and I ate them, (I mean c’mon now, they are cookies) but I’ve always preferred my cookies on the softer side. Don’t you?

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While wandering the grocery store aisles for my regular shopping I passed by these butterscotch chips and I began to feel nostalgic for the days of oatmeal scotchies baked by my mom. It seemed like as good an excuse as any so I threw them in my cart along with the other regular cookie ingredients (stocking up my Seattle kitchen!). When I got home I wanted to get to work right away. No time to waste for cookie making! I decided to start with the recipe on the back of the bag with some alterations (when do I ever follow a recipe exactly these days?). I tasted a few chips before starting and was surprised by how sweet they were (things are never too sweet when you’re a kid). So I decided to tone down the sugar a bit. I threw in some toasted pecans to help counterbalance the sweetness. And just for fun I made half the batch with dried cranberries instead of butterscotch chips to see how that would go. Dried cranberries are part of the fall flavor collection it seems.

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The first batch - too crunchy!

The first batch – too crunchy!

Nonetheless I was disappointed with these cookies. (I mean, again, I ate them because they’re cookies for goodness sake, but I wanted them to be better.) These were too crispy and flat and the pecans hardly made a difference. So I ditched the pecans and ditched the recipe on the bag and started over. I turned to my great grandma’s recipe box, a beautiful heirloom handed down to me from my grandmother. I pulled out her recipe for oatmeal drop cookies and I made it (followed it exactly!) – half with raisins as the recipe states, half with butterscotch chips. They were soft and chewy and had just the right flavor of fall.

Are you sick of pumpkin yet? Okay, maybe not, but give these a try if you want something different. Maybe I’ll spark a new fall flavor tradition!

As a side note: these butterscotch chips are super sweet and a little fakey. My next project would be to figure out how to make better HOMEMADE butterscotch chips. Please leave a comment if you know any great butterscotch recipes!

Grandma’s Oatmeal Scotchies (or Oatmeal Raisin cookies)

1/2 cup shortening*

1 cup granulated sugar

1 egg

5 T. milk

1 tsp. vanilla extract

1 1/2 cups flour

1/2 tsp. salt

1 tsp. baking powder

1/2 tsp. allspice

3/4 tsp. ground cinnamon

1 3/4 cup rolled oats

1/2 cup butterscotch chips (or raisins)

1/2 cup toasted pecans (optional)

*You can try substituting butter for the shortening in this cookie, but you will sacrifice the texture! Using all shortening makes for softer cookies. I have not tried doing half butter and half shortening, but I imagine that would be pretty good.

Start by creaming your shortening and sugar for a few minutes with an electric beater. Add the egg and vanilla and continue to beat until light and fluffy. Add milk and mix to incorporate. Don’t worry if it looks too curdled. Add in your flour, salt, baking powder, and spices and stir with a spatula to incorporate. Lastly add your oats and butterscotch chips and mix.

My great grandma’s recipe says to bake these in a moderate oven, which I interpreted as 350 or 375. Scoop onto ungreased cookie sheets and bake for 12-15 minutes at 350. It should be a shorter baking time in a 375 degree oven and they may brown a little more. These came out a little pale in the end. Remove from pans and allow to cool.

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Enjoy warm with a glass of milk and a cozy blanket while you watch the fall foliage. Mmm fall!