Post 92 – How About Them Apples!

We took our annual apple picking trip Columbus Day weekend and we returned with 66 pounds of apples!

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(Ah the beauty of nature! I just love the color of these apples! Like purple plums! I wonder what happens to those sad apples that fall to the ground…)

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Our 66 pound stash included a full bag of just Honeycrisp (delicious!), some baking apples like Cortland (pie!) and some tasty eating apples like Gala and Fuji. We had the pleasure of hosting my brother-in-law and sister-in-law for the weekend so they helped us pick more than our usual amount.

On our way home from apple picking, we also made a stop at Walden Pond where we enjoyed snapping some silly panoramas with the scenic fall backdrop. Despite the cold temperatures and constant drizzle of rain during our picking, it was a wonderful way to spend a chilly fall day.

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Sadly the weekend had to end at some point. We sent them home with as many apples as they could carry and promises to visit them in their new home in Luxembourg in the future.

After a weekend of eating apples for breakfast, lunch, and dinner, pie baking, and making our famous meat-stuffed apples (as well as sending some back with my brother-in-law and sister-in-law), we were down to about 35 pounds! I made some applesauce this past weekend and our stash is down even lower! We’ll see how long it takes to finish these off.

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While making the applesauce I enjoyed an informal apple tasting, stealing a slice of different apples here and there, comparing the texture and sweetness and crunch. I have always marveled at the beautiful colors nature creates with real, good foods, but I am even more amazed that even just within the category of apples how many different colors they come in. Check out this rainbow of apples!

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I hope you are enjoying the last few days of warmer temperatures and bouts of sunshine. The winter will be here before we know it.

Eat well!

 

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Post 88 – Prioritizing Health

If I’m being completely honest, I haven’t been feeling as well as I could lately. I love to eat and always have, but my love for food has begun to take priority over my health. My discomfort has been mostly internal, which makes it easier to hide and easier to deny. I am the one to experience all of the symptoms and whether or not other people around me are affected depends mostly on my experience of the symptoms. Is it bad enough that I am complaining constantly and no fun to be around, or do I discreetly hide my discomfort with a weak smile? Having digestive distress is embarrassing and awkward to have to explain to people. No one likes to talk about bodily functions (and dysfunctions) and no one wants to hear about yours. Yet if it affects your daily life, your social interactions, and your meals it is tough to avoid.

Since the fall of 2012 I have struggled with what first manifested itself as acid reflux symptoms, which I initially dealt with through medication. I have since decided that this approach is not sustainable and healthy in the long term. After doing a lot of research and reflection I have realized that I must change my approach to food and eating in order to change the way I feel. Eating should be about balance as well as pleasure Рnourishing your body and your spirit through the consumption of food, but also the company of others. When I am sad and alone I fill that sadness with food. When I am surrounded by those I love and I can appreciate the moment, food loses the center of attention. I can focus on being with people that are important to me while also savoring a meal. When I let my guard down, I convince myself that eating whatever I want (especially if everyone else is doing it) is okay despite the consequences that come later. Though I have tried several different remedies to alleviate my symptoms from medicine to eating gluten free to eliminating seemingly every category of good food, I still have not found the solution.

One category of foods I have been reading about for the past several months is a group of poorly digested carbohydrates known as FODMAPs. These foods are found across nearly all food groups, except animal proteins – wheat, dairy, fruits, vegetables, sweeteners, and beans and can cause digestive distress in certain people. My next step is to try eating a low FODMAP diet to see if these foods are the problem in addition to focusing on portion, context (am I really hungry or does that food just look good?), and stress.

I am sharing all of this information with you because I want to feel better and I need your support. My love for food has caused me to prioritize the pleasure I get from eating over my health (and the discomfort that comes later).

In taking the next step, I will focus on these goals:

1) following a low FODMAP diet

2) listening to my body to determine when I am hungry and when to slow down

3) finding ways to relax and be stress-free when eating (as much as possible) to allow for proper digestion

The weeks surrounding my wedding I enjoyed wonderful food, surroundings, and love from my family and friends. At the time I wanted to be able to fully enjoy those foods without restricting myself too much. Now the celebration has ended (though the happiness continues!) and I must recognize that prioritizing my health over my stubborn desire to eat whatever I want is a necessity.

As I’m beginning to learn, my problems come from not only what I am eating, but also how much and how often. One of the toughest challenges is adapting a healthy lifestyle within American cultural standards as we are a nation constantly on the go and eating junk. If you struggle with food issues, I invite you to reflect on the emotions surrounding food in your life and what you can do to change them. This is your one life to live.

Thank you for your support in this journey. I look forward to sharing my low FODMAP recipes in the near future!